(antes ACCIÓN COLECTIVA)
 

 
In Aktion Kolectiva’s laboratory we are constantly involved in theo-retical and practical explorations and reflections based on the body/mind in motion. The aim is to create theories and practices which stimulate the physical and psychophysical aspects of the dancer and actor.

MOVEMENTS STRATEGIES

  • This work has developed due to the fusioning of elements derived from the different worlds of; modern and postmodern dance strategies, certain theatrical tendencies, eastern movement principles and body therapy techniques.
  • The main aim is to liberate the flow of energy in the body by freeing blockages within the physiological and anatomical systems, and encourage its expression through the cinesthetic and kinesthetic senses.  This is done primarily through a series of floor exercises which pay special attention to the body’s alignment and use of the breath , in this way it becomes possible to connect with inner bodily  impulses which are then worked with to elaborate personal  movement signs and scripts, which form the basis for the second area of the work : the creative and improvisational territories.

“ LIVING ART AND MOVEMENT PRACTICES”
A Composition Workshop.

  • During this workshop we analyze the modern and postmodern dance traditions, and also help participants to create their own choreographic material, respecting their particular ideas and needs.
  • The modern and postmodern tradition in North America, the expressionist and neoexpressionist tradition in Germany (and its relation to the Butoh dance movement in Japan), and the influence of eastern approaches to the body are some of the areas we discuss. We see how these movements have determined and influenced training techniques and creative strategies throughout the twentieth century.
  • We also analyze the different approaches and uses of the fundamental choreographic elements of energy/time/space in the different movements and historical periods.
  • The participants will develop their own movement signs and scripts creating their own particular choreographic discourse.

 

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